A List Of Frequently Used Interjections in Shona Language

General A List Of Frequently Used Interjections in Shona Language

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This post contains frequently used interjections in the Shona language you may come across so often both in the written or spoken form.


Yuhwi
  • Yuhwi meaning: This is used for expressing surprise or shock after hearing/reading juicy gossip or witnessing interesting events play out. However, most of the time "Yuhwi" it's often used by Zim women instead of Zim men.

e.g. "Yuhwi, zvariri basa nhai imi."


Hezvo or Hezvoness
  • Hezvo or Hezvoness meaning: This is used for expressing annoyance, anger or frustration. But can also be used when reacting to unexpected shocking events.

e.g. "Hezvo! ndochii ichocho chauri kundiitira. Ndikwanire handidi zvemuyedzo pano"


Twabam
  • Twabam meaning: This is mainly used as an exclamation of triumph and celebration. But can also be used for emphasizing a punchline or a witty comeback.

e.g. "Ukada kundi sizer maV11 nemafaira ako ndinawo ndokuyanika izvezvi. Ndosaka wakatambwa chipoko round muchegotsi industry, Twabam!"

or "Twabam Nyama" (to emphasize a celebration event in the form of a braii (or gochi gochi) sometimes accompanied by live music performances, etc).


Bho
  • Bho meaning: This is used for expressing agreement, thanking another person or simply saying yes.

e.g. "Bho! Wagona ndokubata same time tomorrow wangu"


Hayas or Ahyas
  • Hayas meaning: This is used for expressing exasperation or self-pity.

e.g. "Hayas, wamukira kudhakwa futi makuseni akadaii?"

or "Hayas, zvandinenge ndarasa mari yangu—aya ndo anonzi ma1 chaiwo"


Hatizvidi
  • Hatizvidi meaning: This is used for expressing negation or refusal and is often repeated about three times during public speeches.

e.g. "Hatizvidi, hatizvidi, hatizvidi... pasi nemhanduuu -- pasi navo!"


Ngazviende
  • Ngazviende meaning: This is also used for expressing negation, contempt or dismissal. It's closely related to 'hatizvidi' and likewise, it's an exclamation often repeated three times during public speeches.

e.g. "Ngazviende, ngazviende, ngazviende... vavengi ne vatengesi are enemises of progress!"


Iiii, Eeee or Hiii
Iiii, Eeee or Hiii meaning: This is used for expressing joyful excitement or regret and can be written in each of those three ways. The meaning remains the same still.

e.g. "Eeee askana ka, zvatanga huya uone zviri pano wena"


Pakaipur or Pakaipa
  • Pakaipur or Pakaipa meaning: This is used for expressing surprise or shocking excitement and can be written in each of those two ways although 'pakaipur' is more of a stylized way of writing it. However, the pronunciation remains the same.

e.g. "Ndati pakaipa mheni, haha, mira uone. Nhasi hakudanwe anonzwa."


Haaa Futika?
  • Haaa futika meaning: This is used for expressing hesitation, doubt or disagreement.

e.g. "Haaa futika, kuti kudaro here askana?"


Hesi
  • Hesi meaning: This is used as a form of a greeting to a person roughly the same age as you or younger than you. But this should NOT be used when talking to an adult or senior citizen. It's interpreted as a lack of respect in Shona culture.

e.g. "Hesi, madhiri ari seyi nhasi wangu?"


Aizve
  • Aizve meaning: This is used for expressing a mild, indifferent surprise.

e.g. "Aizve, saka vakazozvifambisa sei paya?"


Heyi, Heyi
  • Heyi, Heyi meaning: This is used as a means to draw attention to the speaker. And usually, it's said twice or thrice.

e.g. "Heyi, heyi, ndo indescipline iyoyo mukatodara ndozvivharisa!"


Note: an interjection is simply an exclamatory word or phrase often used to express emotion or to highlight a specific point.
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