question Why does my voice sound different when I record?

G

Guntrisha LaShondra

guest
After tracking is done and during playback, my voice sounds different why?
 
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What you hear when you speak to someone or when you sing for someone is the sound going through the bone in your head. This is different when you are listening to your own voice through nearfield or midfield speakers. In short, the aforementioned phenomenon is called bone conduction.

In addition, the type of microphone (i.e., condenser, dynamic, or ribbon microphone) you use plays a significant role in the end result. Don't forget the quality of it too. Not all microphones are the same even though they may be of the same type. Their frequency response will always be different from one manufacturer to another manufacturer's specifications.
L

Lorenzo

guest
It's mostly because you're used to hearing your own voice through bone conduction, so when you switch to hearing it through studio monitors, it sounds different. My assumption is that you weren't also using outboard effects when tracking.
 

Bla Jedza

apprentice
Because you sing, you don't talk. On a serious note, you should check your proximity to the mic. If you are too close to a microphone your voice is going to sound more bassy and when you are at a distance your voice will sound thin i.e., with less low-end energy.
 

Scorpio

grand master
Your own head plays a part in detecting the sounds and vibrations when you speak or sing. You are not just hearing your voice coming out of your mouth. Thus when you listen to something from speakers, you are hearing it just through your ears.
 
D

Daddy 2 Sugar

guest
As others have said, bone conduction plays a big part and that's true. We tend to hear a lot more low frequencies in our voices through our heads from the vibrations when we sing and talk.
 
What you hear when you speak to someone or when you sing for someone is the sound going through the bone in your head. This is different when you are listening to your own voice through nearfield or midfield speakers. In short, the aforementioned phenomenon is called bone conduction.

In addition, the type of microphone (i.e., condenser, dynamic, or ribbon microphone) you use plays a significant role in the end result. Don't forget the quality of it too. Not all microphones are the same even though they may be of the same type. Their frequency response will always be different from one manufacturer to another manufacturer's specifications.
 
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N

Nyikadzino

guest
Try fixing your sound recordings with a touch of EQ and compression. But if other people honestly like the way you sound you shouldn't obsess over it. Or maybe you should consider upgrading your current stereophonic speakers and headphones you are using during playback. Some stereo speakers may lead you to believe you are doing something wrong when this is not the case.
 
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