gemhu park

a family unit comprising of children with different totems (mitupo) because mommy has multiple baby daddies.

This slang phrase is derived from how in a wildlife preserve you will find a wide variety of animals all belonging to their respective groups (e.g. zebras, lions, elands, elephants, etc).

In Shona culture these groups would be called family clans (dzinza) and each unique group associated with a specific animal is referred to as mutupo ("totem").

Hence, in the context of a woman with multiple baby daddies you'll have something like this:
  • 1st child's totem (m) = Mhofu ("eland")
  • 2nd child's totem (f) = Madhuve ("zebra")
  • 3rd child's totem (m) = Sinyoro ("heart")
  • 4th child's totem (f) = Masivanda ("lion")
As you can see from the example above, all those children have a unique totem which reflects that they have different biological fathers and that is why Zimbos will call that particular family a gemhu park ("game reserve").
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Nolwazi Kwayedza
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