Numero Uno

grand master
What are best EQ and compression settings to use as frequency starting points based on the Fibonacci sequence (by Leonardo Pisano Bigollo)?
 
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W
There is no inherent relationship between audio mixing, mastering, and the Fibonacci sequence. The Fibonacci sequence is a mathematical concept involving a series of numbers in which each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers. It has been used in various fields, such as art, architecture, and biology, but it does not have any direct relevance to audio mixing or mastering.

Black Panther

grand master
@Black Panther Can y'all convert these frequencies from hertz to milliseconds:
  • 34 Hz
  • 55 Hz
  • 89 Hz
  • 144 Hz
  • 233 Hz
  • 377 Hz
  • 610 Hz
  • 987 Hz
  • 1597 Hz
  • 2584 Hz
  • 4181 Hz
  • 6765 Hz
  • 10946 Hz
  • 17711 Hz

There you go — conversion from cycles per second (Hz) to milliseconds (ms):
  • 34 Hz = 29.411764705882 ms
  • 55 Hz = 18.181818181818 ms
  • 89 Hz = 11.23595505618 ms
  • 144 Hz = 6.9444444444444 ms
  • 233 Hz = 4.2918454935622 ms
  • 377 Hz = 2.6525198938992 ms
  • 610 Hz = 1.6393442622951 ms
  • 987 Hz = 1.0131712259372 ms
  • 1597 Hz = 0.62617407639324 ms
  • 2584 Hz = 0.38699690402477 ms
  • 4181 Hz = 0.23917723032767 ms
  • 6765 Hz = 0.14781966001478 ms
  • 10946 Hz = 0.091357573542847 ms
  • 17711 Hz = 0.056462085709446 ms

Here I have rounded things off to 3 significant figures:
  • 34 Hz = 29.4 ms
  • 55 Hz = 18.2 ms
  • 89 Hz = 11.2 ms
  • 144 Hz = 6.94 ms
  • 233 Hz = 4.29 ms
  • 377 Hz = 2.65 ms
  • 610 Hz = 1.64 ms
  • 987 Hz = 1.01 ms
  • 1597 Hz = 0.626 ms
  • 2584 Hz = 0.387 ms
  • 4181 Hz = 0.239 ms
  • 6765 Hz = 0.148 ms
  • 10946 Hz = 0.0914 ms
  • 17711 Hz = 0.0565 ms
 

Black Panther

grand master
How do you convert Hz to milliseconds?

It's very simple and this is how you do it.

First example: let's convert 20 Hz to milliseconds (ms):
  • You always divide X Hz into 1
  • 1/20 = 0.05
  • Then you multiply your result by 1000
  • 0.05 x 1000 = 50 milliseconds
Second example: let's convert 440 Hz to milliseconds (ms):
  • Again you always divide X Hz into 1
  • 1/440 = 0.00227272727
  • Then you multiply your result by 1000
  • 0.00227272727 x 1000 = 2.27 milliseconds (i.e., rounded off to 3 significant figures)
Third example: let's convert 12.5 kHz to milliseconds (ms):
  • Once again you always divide X Hz into 1
  • 1/12500 = 0.00008
  • Then you multiply your result by 1000
  • 0.00008 x 1000 = 0.08 milliseconds
 
G

gosia

guest
What are best EQ and compression settings to use as frequency starting points based on the Fibonacci sequence (by Leonardo Pisano Bigollo)?

thank you for considering this for your music. world needs more musicians like yourself.
have a look at his book "The Power of Sound" by Joshua Leeds"
 
W

Widzo

guest
There is no inherent relationship between audio mixing, mastering, and the Fibonacci sequence. The Fibonacci sequence is a mathematical concept involving a series of numbers in which each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers. It has been used in various fields, such as art, architecture, and biology, but it does not have any direct relevance to audio mixing or mastering.
 
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